IB students wow the crowds with their thoughtful artworks
Posted 03/22/2016 02:20PM

 

An isolation room, stop animation, sculptures, paintings, video installations and much more were on display at an art gallery in the Jewelry Souk of Beirut Souks.

Looking into the gallery, one would not guess that the 80 art pieces it was showcasing were the works of high school students, but those of established artists.

Not only were many of the works of high artistic value, but they were also thought-provoking and motivated by depth.

A broken concrete slab over a bruised egg captured the idea that things may appear fragile but might have more strength than meets the eye. A painting of a single lit match reminded that a small flame can brighten up a dark place and bring much-needed hope to a community, or even a civilization. A video installation about identity urged viewers not to be afraid of society and to stick with their beliefs no matter what they were. An isolation room challenged the visitor to enter and experience emotional isolation (guided by an audio). A stop animation piece of a mouth spewing binary numbers was a vivid reminder of how we are ruled by technology nowadays.

Many of the artworks addressed a variety of themes and concerns that reflect the culture and political context of the world in which students live, including the refugee and trash crises, wars, and the lack of appreciation for art.

The creativity, thought, and talent were evident, and they prompted a positive review by The Daily Star of the three-day exhibit, which opened on Thursday evening, running until 9pm on Saturday March 19, 2016.

The turnout was impressive as well, attracting high numbers of visitors on all
three days.

Each year the International Baccalaureate program requires the visual arts diploma students to present their artworks in a public exhibition, explained Mary Mckone, IB Visual Arts Teacher. “For the past three years Solidere has been generous in allowing us to hold our annual IB Visual Arts Show in one of their gallery spaces in the Beirut Souks,” she added.

Because they are required to explore a wide variety of media, IB students investigate theoretical and conceptual approaches to creating art, noted Mary Mckone.

“This approach to art making and investigation has added a depth of understanding and cultural reflection not often seen in students’ artwork of this age group,” she added.

“Mary Mckone and her talented senior students have created a very powerful and interesting show,” commented Head of School Hamilton Clark.

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